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Vermont State Parks are Seeking Public Input on 2022 Proposed Rule & Fee Changes

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Visitors to Vermont State Parks come to recreate in a safe and welcoming environment. During their stay they count on a clean, friendly and relaxing experience. To help guide that experience rules are established for visitor behavior and to help protect these amazing places for the long term. Even though managing Vermont State Parks and hosting well over 1 million visitors each year is a complex operation, our aim is to keep the associated rules as simple as possible and to maintain an environment where expectations are clear and opportunities are available to all. The establishment of rules and fees for Vermont State Parks is governed through legislative authority, State Statute Title Ten Section 2603c, and there is a lengthy process set in place for changing rules and setting fees. Periodically we consider changes and must follow the rule making process to do so. An important piece of this process is the opportunity for elected officials and the general public to weigh in. Proposed c

Spring Beauty and Fresh Starts at Niquette Bay State Park

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Hepatica at Niquette Bay - Lisa Liotta Spring is full of fresh starts (including the  Parks Operating Season ). As Park Staff prepared for the park season, Niquette Bay State Park began filling with spring wildflowers. Niquette Bay State Park houses many wildflower colonies that put on a beautiful show for just a few weeks this time of year. Learn what makes these short-lived beauties so special and what types of flowers you might find! What are Spring Ephemerals? These are unique early blooming wildflowers that grow, flower, and seed all in the very short 6-8 week window before the shade from leaf trees covers the forest floor.  By the time deciduous trees have leaves, these flowers will be gone. Where do they grow? The best location to find these is in a predominately hardwood, deciduous forest with large trees and little undergrowth.  They can grow very well on rocky ledges in less-than-ideal soil conditions. These plants are usually very small and begin growing under the cover of

2022 Growing Works of Art Contest Winners!

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  2022 Contest Theme... Share your TREE-mendous Story! This year’s theme celebrates the connections we share with trees &  showcases a meaningful experience or memory enjoyed because of the trees in our lives.  Students were asked to write a short story and create art illustrating their chosen tree.      Thanks to all students and teachers who participated this year, we truly enjoyed seeing all your creativity & observations come alive!

Advance Reservations for Waterbury Reservoir Remote Campsites Beginning May 2, 2022

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Contact:  Nick Caputo, Northeast Parks Regional Manager Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation | Agency of Natural Resources (802) 479-8587, nick.caputo@vermont.gov MONTPELIER – Each year, more than 75,000 visitors enjoy the natural and recreational opportunities offered at Vermont’s 863-acre Waterbury Reservoir. Little River State Park, Waterbury Center State Park, and the surrounding Mt. Mansfield State Forest offer access to boating, swimming, paddling, fishing, camping, hiking, and mountain biking. The recently upgraded boat launches at the Waterbury Dam, Blush Hill, and Moscow paddlers’ access areas have allowed easier access for boaters and remote campers. Beginning May 2, 2022, at 9:00 a.m., all 27 remote campsites along the reservoir perimeter will become available to reserve for any date in the 2022 operating season.  Beginning June 1, 2022, at 9:00am, reservations for the 2023 season will become available to be reserved up to 11 months in advance like at other Vermont st

Protect Vermont's Hiking and Biking Trails During Mud Season

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:     April 1, 2022                CONTACT:   Becca Washburn, VT Dept. of Forests, Parks and Recreation, becca.washburn@vermont.gov             Protect Vermont’s Hiking and Biking Trails During Mud Season Vermont – The Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation (FPR) wants to remind the public that it is mud season and many trails around the state are closed through Memorial Day weekend. Mud season is the time period (typically the duration of April and May), when hiking and biking trails are extremely wet and muddy due to the combined effects of snow melt, thawing ground, and seasonal rain. We ask the public to avoid muddy, soft trails, especially at high elevations, in order to protect the trails, protect alpine vegetation, and leave trails in good shape for the hiking and biking season. “Trail organizations and land managers, along with hundreds of dedicated volunteers, work hard to keep the trails in good condition throughout the hiking and b

Help us find the next all-star state parks team and receive a 10-punch day use pass

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Parks may be cold, but recruitment season is heating up! We know there are incredible future park staff in each and every one of our communities and we can’t operate our parks without great people! To make sure our future state parks all-stars have their chance to shine, we need your help to spread the word to every corner of Vermont. Our goal is to hang fliers in every county in the state, in every community location possible. That’s where you come in. We are looking for volunteers to flyer around the state and in return, volunteers will receive a free 10-punch day use pass that never expires.   How do can you participate? Request to be part of the program by emailing parks@vermont.gov your name, mailing address, and phone number and indicate which county you wish to flyer. Hang 20 Vermont State Parks employment posters on sanctioned bulletin boards and other appropriate locations (with permission when required) in your community and surrounding communities. Great locations might

Winter Larder: The Underground Caches of Moles and Shrews

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Illustration of  Parascalops breweri  from "The Quadrupeds of N. America" . Check out our latest guest blog from long-time Park Manager Tiffany Soukup of Vagabond Way . This article originally appeared as an article in Northern Woodlands .