Get the Sled Out: Where to Go Sledding in Vermont State Parks

For Vermonters, the winter landscape is like an outdoor playground! There are a lot of ways to play in the snow, but there is nothing quite like feeling the wind whipping and the snow flying as you careen down a hill on a sled. For your luging pleasure, we have put together a list of some great sledding hills in Vermont State Parks to try out this winter:   

Mt. Philo State Park:
You may have visited this popular park in the summer to take in the spectacular summit views, but have you ever had the chance to experience Mt. Philo in the winter? A short hike up the park road brings you to the top of a wide run with gentle turns that’s perfect for a fast-paced sled trip.
 
In the winter, this park’s favored picnic spot transforms into an ideal sledding hill. The steep, treeless slope is located near the lower parking lot and overlooks the Waterbury Reservoir so you can enjoy an expansive view as you speed down the hill.

Elmore State Park:
For younger kids or beginning sledders, Elmore offers some smaller, gentle hills found by the Hickory and Juniper lean-tos. Bring your cross-country skis to explore the park after your sled runs.

Mt. Ascutney State Park: 
For more experienced, speed-seeking sledders, the steep park roads at Mt. Ascutney are exhilarating. Take your sled for a spin on the Summit Road for some extreme runs.

The Smugglers’ Notch Pass, Stowe:
This narrow, winding road runs between Stowe and Jeffersonville on Route 108. Closed from October-May, the road is a popular sledding destination after the snow falls. The steep incline and curving road make the mile hike to the top worth it. Snowshoes are recommended.


Now is the time to get out and explore Vermont’s winter wonderland! Remember to sled safely and to take a look at our Off-Season Park Use page for information on parking and facilities in Vermont State Parks during the winter.

Comments

  1. Forgot to mention Underhill State Park and its winding CCC Road

    ReplyDelete

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